Pet Detectives

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

One of my clients told me a story about her lost dog that is really hard to imagine. Here it is.

Her dog escaped from the house and seemed to be lost for several days. My client hired a pet detective, Jackie Phillips, and they tracked the scent of her lost dog to a spot in Golden Gate Park. Running up to the gardener, my client was surprised to learn that he had found the little lost dog, but unfortunately, it had been hit by a car and killed at 19th and Lincoln and he had buried it near a beautiful large tree.

Even though it is a heartbreaking tale, it is still quite amazing that the tracking dogs were able to follow the scent of the lost dog so accurately. Since then, I have passed along this information to many dog walkers and they have had very successful results.

This might be a great method to try to find your lost dog, if you ever need one.  Just be sure to call her right away, without delay!

Jackie Phillips, certified pet detective (510) 415-6185

San Francisco Dog Walker-Ticks in San Francisco

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

San Francisco Dog WalkerGolden Gate Park and Fort Funston are crawling with ticks. Even if your dog has prevention, such as a tick collar, they still crawl off of him and on to you! Be sure to check your dog over carefully when you return home and frequent grooming and chemicals for control may help to control the spread.

Ticks can detect heat emitted from dogs and humans from far distances and will often situate themselves on well traveled paths to gain access to hosts. They will generally drop off the animal when full, but this may take several days. In some cases ticks will live for some time on the blood of an animal. Ticks are more active outdoors in warm weather, but can attack a dog at any time. Ticks can be found in most wooded or forested regions throughout the world. As a San Francisco dog walker, I find that they are especially common in areas where there are deer trails or human tracks. Ticks are especially abundant near water, where warm-blooded animals come to drink, and in meadows wherever shrubs and brush provide woody surfaces and cover. Ticks are a vector for a number of diseases including Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

The American dog tick
The American dog tick is perhaps the most well-known of the North American hard ticks. This tick does not carry Lyme disease but can carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. As a San Francisco dog walker I have come across them numerous times.
The black-legged tick

The Western black-legged tick lives in the western part of North America and is responsible for spreading Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. It tends to prefer livestock such as cows as its adult host.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever can be lethal. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease include sudden onset of fever, headache and muscle pain followed by development of rash. The disease can be difficult to diagnose in the early stages, and without prompt and appropriate treatment it can be fatal. Tetracycline has dramatically reduced the number of deaths caused by Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

The San Francisco dog walkers top tips
Check your dog over when you get home. Put your clothes in the dryer on high heat or just simply wash them in hot water.  Be sure to check yourself over too!

watch this video for more tips!   5min.com/Video/How-to-Remove-a-Tick-from-Your-Dog

Tick Season Hits McLaren Park

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker – Excerpt from Save McLaren Park Newsletter

Ticks are currently abundant in McLaren Park. Tom Scott of Save McLaren Park said, “In the past two weeks alone I’ve found 3 different ticks on me. I don’t recall finding any ticks in the previous 8 years that I’ve been going to the park. My dog remains tick-free thanks to the medication she uses.”

Suggestions when going to the park: Apply mosquito repellent, especially to your legs and even if you’re wearing pants. Also, it’s a good idea to check yourself after returning from the park. Ticks tend to go for warm moist areas, such as armpits and groins.

Tom explains, “the ticks I found on myself have been identified as Dermacentor variabilis, also known as American Dog Tick and Wood Tick. This species is not known to carry Lyme Disease, but it can carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. It’s unlikely, though, that the ticks in McLaren carry this disease. I don’t think this is an urgent health concern for park users, but something to be aware of.”

San Francisco Dog Walkers deal with Foxtails

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

Tips from San Francisco Dog Walkers – Costly Foxtails

All Dog Walkers should tell you the faster you get the dog to the vet, the less it will probably cost to get the foxtail out. The reason for this is that if the vet can remove it without knocking the dog out with anesthesia, then it will be less expensive.

So, as soon as you dog shows symptons, like shaking head and holding his head to the side, licking paw, flapping ears or sneezing violently, run, don’t walk him to your vet. If the vet does not have to put the dog under to grab the foxtail the cost is around $150 for removal. However if you wait a day or two before taking the dog to the vet, the foxtail will travel further up the canal and the cost jumps up around $500 – $1,000 because the foxtail has to be surgically removed by a veterinarian. If the foxtail causes an infection because you waited, the trip to the vet could run you at least $1,000.00 to $2,000.00!   Not removing the foxtail is very dangerous and can be life threatening to the dog because the foxtail penetrates the skin and moves through the bloodstream towards the heart or brain.   Doing “nothing” is not an option!

Dog Walkers should always tell their clients to check their dogs for foxtails during the spring and summer months following a hike.

San Francisco Dog Walkers Photo of Foxtail

Foxtails come from the grasses and are in all of the parks in San Francisco.  When pulled apart, the are little arrow shaped pointed stickers that it can burrow into your dogs’  paws, ears, nose, eyes and fur coat.

ON A DAILY BASIS, during foxtail season (when grasses are dry) it is VERY important to check between your dogs’ toes (look up into the cavity of each toe and feel around in there); and to thoroughly feel around in the dog’s fur for foxtails.  I try my best to remove the foxtails I see after the walk, but it is always good for the owner to double check, as foxtails can and often are, missed.

If your dog begins sneezing violently, even if they stop for a day or two, they most likely have a foxtail in their nose.

San Francisco Dog Walker photo of foxtails before they drop
San Francisco Dog Walkers share how to keep your dog from getting foxtails:

■ Keep your pet’s fur coat short, especially between the toes and around the ears.

■ Long-haired dogs are most prone to having foxtails attach to their fur and embed in the skin.

■  Avoid walking your dog in areas where dry grass is prevalent.

■ Prime areas for foxtails to penetrate the skin of an animal are between the toes, in and around the ears, nose, armpits and genitalia. Animals with foxtails under the skin are often licking the affected area where a red bump may be seen.

■ When returning home from a walk or hike in an area that might have foxtails, examine your dog thoroughly and remove any burrs or foxtails you might find before they have a chance to burrow into the skin.

Educational Video Re: Coyote Behaviors

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

Coyote are a part of the San Francisco landscape and are here to stay. Now might be a good time to review some coyote behaviors and what you could do should you encounter one on a walk. This information is now available from CoyoteCoexistence.Com in their video presentation.

Dogs Can Die From The Summer Heat!! BEWARE!

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

Dogs

 

Dogs Can Die From Heat Stroke!

Animal experts say that it’s a common misconception that dogs can survive if the windows are cracked on a hot day, or if the car is parked in the shade. They said people often think that dogs can handle high temperatures.  Wrong!  In fact, even a dog walk in high heat can hurt or kill them.  Dogs can get overheated much quicker than we can. Their temperature can shoot up to 104, 105 in just a matter of ten to fifteen minutes, and that can lead to a seizure. Even cracking a window a little bit, thinking they’ll be okay isn’t enough in  to keep them safe.  There’s not enough breeze.  Dogs don’t cool down the way we do.  They cool down by panting.

If you think your dog is suffering from heatstroke, get him out of the heat as soon as possible. Here are a few other things you can do:

  • Put rubbing alcohol on the pads of their feet.
  • Pour cool – not cold – water on them.  Start with their feet, neck, and genital areas.
  • Wrap them in a sheet or other cloth that’s been soaked with cool water.
  • Get your dog to the vet!  Even if you think your dog is OK, it’s a good idea to have him checked out.

Heatstroke or exhaustion can occur very quickly for our dogs as they only have the ability to sweat throught the pads of their feet. The major way they expel heat is through panting. The two most common ways that pets get overheated is being left in cars or kennels when it is too hot or playing or running excessively in the heat. Our canine friends are almost always up for a brisk dog walk or a game of fetch. The problem is that they do not know when they are overheated until it is too late. Thus, it is up to us as their caregivers to understand when it is time to take a break, drink some water and rest in the shade for awhile. A dog’s normal temperature runs between 101 and 102.5 degrees so they are naturally warmer than we are. When their temperature exceeds 106 degrees there is a very real danger in damaging cells in their brain and causing permanent damage or even death. Treatment for heat stroke is immediately getting the pet into a cool shady  area or inside an air-conditioned building. Cooling can be continued with cool cloths or ice packs in the groin area or in the armpits.  It is important not to submerge the pet in cold water as this can lead to shock.

Bottom line:  Dogs can’t handle the heat as well as we can and run the risk of developing heat stroke much more quickly.  Even if you leave the window open and park in the shade, it may not be good enough.  The test to tell if it is too hot to leave your pet in the car, if it is too hot for you in the car, it is way to hot for your dog.  And don’t forget the longer you are away, the hotter your car gets.  Even 15 minutes may be too long.

Some summer problems to look out for!

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

San Francisco Dog Walker- bee

It is very common at this time of the year that dogs will have swollen faces with eyes that are nearly closed up. In most cases this is from a bee sting. It can also be from vegetation that is caused by allergies. In most cases an antihistamine, such as Benedryl, will will take the swelling and discomfort down rapidly, but in severe cases it may be necessary for the pet to be seen to receive treatment with cortisone or even epinephrine. During times when insect activity is high, it is not safe to use repellants like OFF to discourage them from attacking your pet, because it contains DEET which is poisonous if ingested by dogs.  Instead try, K9-Advantix, which repels mosquitoes, ticks and fleas.

By far the most common concern seen in the spring and summer months involves pets that eat things that they shouldn’t. This can happen any time of the year, but when the weather is nice and the ground is warm and moist it becomes a perfect incubator for viruses, bacteria and parasites.

San Francisco Dog Walker – Save your pet with CPR

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

The San Francisco Dog Walker shares CPR steps to saving a dogs life!

San Francisco Dog Walker-Dogs-CPR

What you need to know about tennis balls

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

Does your dog love to chase after tennis balls? Even, perhaps, a little obsessed about it?

Something you need to keep in mind is that a tennis ball is made of abrasive material that can quickly wear down your dog’s teeth. Some dogs love them so much that their teeth have ground down to little nubs. This is important because a dog must have their teeth last a lifetime and you definately want to protect them whenever you can.

If you want to nip this problem in the bud, change to rubber balls. Rubber does not have the abrasive properties like the green tennis balls you see at all the dog parks. Why do most people not change to rubber? Not all dogs have problems with tennis balls, so just keep an eye on your dog’s teeth to determine if you need to make any adjustments. Also, they are costly, especially if your dog likes to leave them behind in the bushes.

Does your dog have chronic diarrhea?

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

Then you need to try Firm Up! made by Diggin Your Dog.
This amazing supplement made with 100% natural pumpkin works as a great anti-diarrhea, and oddly enough, it’s good for constipation too!

Pumpkin tastes good to dogs. Add a little to their daily diet, or use as a supplement when the “runs” strike…

Firm Up! is also a great product to use when your dog is transitioning to a different diet. The fiber helps digestion and makes the switch easier.

Firm Up! is 100% USA GROWN dried pumpkin. Pumpkin is low in fat and dense in nutrients such as Alpha-Carotene, Beta Carotene, Fiber, Vitamin C & E, Potassium, Magnesium, and Pantothenic Acid. Find it online for about $8.

Dog’s Left Home Alone

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

Avoid the routine of crating your dog all day.

This can lead to future behavior problems.

The crate is a safe place for the dog to rest, but it doesn’t teach the dog good habits.

Use a crate wisely.

Don’t overuse it.

Knowing DNA can be Beneficial

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

Parent-DNA-CartoonDNA technology has become an extremely important tool for veterinarians in keeping your pet healthy. Many diseases are related to a dog’s genetic make-up. Knowing your mix’s genetic predisposition can help your vet anticipate problems, such as hip dysplasia, so they can provide early diagnosis or preventive care. Knowing the DNA can also help the vet when prescribing medications. Some breeds are allergic to common medications and so this knowledge can help your vet avoid any mishaps.

It is a Miracle! Veterinary Orthopedic Manipulation

Posted by The San Francisco Dog Walker

One of my clients has a 14 year old lab mix dog and the dog’s health has been spiraling downhill for the past year. One day when she was out for a walk, she fell and wound up with a dislocated disc in her back. After that, she could no longer stand, nor walk and even getting outside to go potty was becoming a real struggle.  The owner was ready to put the dog down when I suggested that they try something called VOM.

Veterinary Orthopedic Manipulation is a healing technology that locates areas of the animals nervous system that has fallen out of communication, and re-establishes neuronal communication and thus induces healing.  VOM is singularly the most simple, effective and safe healing modality in veterinary care to date.  VOM exists in a gray area between both professions (Veterinary and Chiropractic) and benefits from the positive aspects of both, a hybrid, and thus more effective than either by themselves.  VOM is not animal chiropractic care.  You may see a response while your pet is on the examination table.  It can be that fast. An experienced Vet may have treated cases who haven’t walked for weeks, given up for dead, with one adjustment thrust and pet stands and walks about the exam room!

VOM is performed by Michael Schneider, who is also a human chiropractor in San Francisco. For a relatively small sum of money, he will come to your house and do a series of procedures on your dog, if you are unable to go to him.  My client’s dog is not only standing, but she is running around and not falling down! She is back on her daily walks and is happy and feeling good.  Find out more about Michael Schneider and VOM go to www.michaelschneiderdc.com or call him directly at 415-292-7878.  This is completely awesome!