UPDATE: Good News! GGNRA dog management plan is permanently OVER!

Posted by the San Francisco Dog Walker
On December 27, 2017, the Federal Register posted notice of the withdrawal of Golden Gate National Recreation Area’s (GGNRA) Dog Management Proposed Rule and termination of the associated Environmental Impact Statement. These notices complete the necessary steps to permanently end the environmental planning and related rulemaking process intended to establish a new regulation on dog management. With this notice, the NPS has now cancelled that planning process and terminated the associated NEPA and rulemaking processes such that no final rule will be issued. The Federal Register notices are posted in the GGNRA reading room.
GGNRA will continue to enforce existing pet regulations detailed in a 1979 pet policy and the Superintendent’s Compendium. The current regulations allow visitors to walk managed dogs under voice or leash control in specific areas of the park.
The nationwide National Park Service regulation requiring dogs to be on-leash will apply to areas not covered by the 1979 policy. GGNRA’s Superintendent’s Compendium also reflects two special regulations that modify the 1979 pet policy for parts of Crissy Field and Ocean Beach. The interim permit requirement for commercial dog walkers and the associated limit of number of dogs walked at one-time continues to remain in effect. Existing pet regulations are available here.
For questions, please call GGNRA Dog Information line at 415-561-4728 or email goga_dogmgt@nps.gov.

(taken directly from the GGNRA website)

WoofieLeaks Reveals Bias in GGNRA Dog Plan

Posted by the San Francisco Dog Walker

San Francisco Bay Area dog groups are suing the government over their plan to eliminate dog walking in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area – GGNRA.  They have launched WoofieLeaks an online website where information exposes a biased federal process which shows contempt for those who dared to stand in the way.

tough times for San Francisco dog walkers in the GGNRA

Tough times for San Francisco Dog Walkers in the GGNRA.

Many of the documents on WoofieLeaks.com raise serious questions regarding a fair planning process. The emails and internal documents were obtained as part of a federal lawsuit for failing to comply with a Freedom of Information Act request.

Morrison & Foerster says these emails and documents are just the tip of the iceberg, pointing out the agency may be withholding a stockpile of emails. For instance, Howard Levitt, the GGNRA’s former Director of Communications and Partnerships, can’t “recall” his password to an email system prior to 2013 and so, the agency claims, those emails are inaccessible. Both Levitt and former Superintendent Frank Dean were also caught using their private email accounts to discuss the dog planning process, according to recently obtained records.

Leptospirosis has been linked to dead seals, but now it’s in the parks too!

Biologist Therapy for DogsPosted by the San Francisco Dog Walker

Five documented cases of Leptospirosis in the past two months!  Don’t let your pets near muddy puddles in the parks or dead seals on the beaches!  Leptospirosis is rarely seen in San Francisco’s dog population, but this year, it’s rampant.

This potentially fatal bacteria is spread through the urine of infected animals, particularly wildlife like raccoons, skunks and coyotes.  If excreted in standing water, it can live for weeks if not months, infecting dogs and other animals tramping through or drinking from puddles.  This year’s marked increase in leptospirosis cases is likely due to the mud and puddles left by the rains.

When the disease is caught in time, most studies show a 75 percent survival rate. Unfortunately, the initial symptoms can be hard to recognize. Symptoms are often non-specific and variable, and can include lethargy, decreased appetite, increased drinking and/or urination, vomiting or diarrhea.

Leptospirosis is preventable: the canine DHLPP vaccine protects against the bacteria, as well as against distemper, hepatitis, parvovirus and parainfluenza. Though the vaccine is not 100 percent effective, it is a dog’s best defense.

If your dog seems to be under the weather, “it is important to bring up to your veterinarian that your dog is out at the park or swims a lot, as these lifestyle components increase exposure to leptospirosis.

The DHLPP vaccination is available at any veterinary office.